Dating clothing union labels


16-Apr-2018 08:02

The placement of the zip can also help – 1930s-1940s dressers usually had a zip in the side seam, whereas dresses from the 50s onwards favoured a placement at the centre back.Labels The label can be full of clues as to an item’s age, making it your go-to when dating vintage.These variations of ILGWU labels were used through 1995--close to the current vintage cutoff year of 1993. UNION LABEL USED FROM 1955-1945 (with AFL-CIO) After 1995, the union adopted a label that says "UNITE" on it. For more details on when each kind of union label was used, see the Vintage Fashion Guild's guide to union labels, here.--- Another excellent resource for labels is the Vintage Fashion Guild's label resource. Metal zippers often indicate an item made before 1960, when plastic zippers for dressmaking became more common.American and Canadian-made clothing often has a union label, which can help determine a date range.

Zippers first became available in plastic in 1963, and by 1968 nylon coil zippers were used in practically every mass produced garment.

By the late 1960s it was a 36” bust and remained so into the early 80s; it’s now a 38” bust.



The following information is a guide to identifying and dating vintage clothing, suits, coats, pants, jackets, and workwear that was sewn by the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America based… continue reading »


Read more

Top Tips for Dating Your Vintage Clothing. 1. Union labels have been appearing in US-made clothing for over a hundred years--so it's true that a lot of vintage.… continue reading »


Read more

A Guide to Identifying ILGWU Union Labels. The most popular union label found in vintage clothing. Visit my article for 13 tips on dating vintage clothing labels!… continue reading »


Read more

MORE ON UNION LABELS & DATING VINTAGE. QUICK TIPS. In your article How Union Labels Help to Date Your Vintage Clothing July 27th, 2012. WHEN USED 1934-1983.… continue reading »


Read more

ILGWU or the International Ladies Garment Worker Union. when they merged with another union, Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America. Union label chart 1… continue reading »


Read more